How to Make Whipped Cream

Homemade whipped cream has been ruining the (convenient) canned stuff for generations. However, if you don’t have an electric mixer (handheld or standing), making whipped cream is very, very time-consuming. If you’re hand-mixing a topping for dessert, don’t save it until the last minute. Trust me—I’ve been ‘that person standing in the kitchen sweating into a bowl of half-stiff cream while friends arrive’ far too many times.


There are, however, certain steps you can take to speed up the process. I’ve detailed a few of them here, but—to be safe—give yourself a solid twenty minutes of beating time before serving. You never know what could happen.



  1. Put your mixing bowl (glass or metal) and whisk (metal preferred) into the freezer and let sit for ten minutes. Colder temperatures allow the cream to solidify more quickly.


  1. When you’re ready to mix, take out your bowl and whisk, pour a quarter cup of cream into the mixing bowl, and beat away. It is imperative to move quickly—the warmer your bowl and whisk become, the slower your liquid will come together.


  1. When bubbles start to form and linger, throw the bowl and whisk into the freezer again, this time for just three or four minutes. This will help the bubbles set. While it’s in the freezer, add whatever sweeteners you want—I typically use powdered sugar and vanilla extract, but go with whatever your heart desires.


  1. Pull the bowl and whisk out of the freezer, add another quarter cup of cream, and beat for several minutes.


  1. When soft peaks begin to form, put the bowl and whisk back into the freezer. Continue this process until you’ve used all the cream.


  1. I find it useful to put the whipped cream in the freezer for several minutes after finishing—this will help the stiff peaks hold their shape when served.